On January 19, Reuters Fact Check tweeted: “Despite repeated misinformation being shared online about the “Great Reset”, this sustainability plan proposed by the World Economic Forum is not a secret plot to end private property or create a totalitarian state.”

In reality, the Great Reset is not a benign plan to achieve sustainability. Nor is it a “secret plot” to “create a totalitarian state.”

The Great Reset is a complex, multi-faceted scheme to institute a sweeping new world order. Unlike past attempts by elites and megalomaniacs who longed to socially reengineer the global order, the Great Reset seeks to accomplish its lofty vision via “soft authoritarianism.”

The architects of the Great Reset would like you to believe that their grand plan is predicated on saving the planet from cataclysmic climate change, but that is simply the justification they cite as the reason their scheme must be adopted over the long-term.

Over the short-term, supporters of the Great Reset have consistently claimed their plan is needed due to the problems created by COVID-19.

As Klaus Schwab, co-founder of the World Economic Forum and leading proponent of the Great Reset recently wrote, “COVID-19 lockdowns may be gradually easing, but anxiety about the world’s social and economic prospects is only intensifying. There is good reason to worry: a sharp economic downturn has already begun, and we could be facing the worst depression since the 1930s. But, while this outcome is likely, it is not unavoidable.

To achieve a better outcome, the world must act jointly and swiftly to revamp all aspects of our societies and economies, from education to social contracts and working conditions. Every country, from the United States to China, must participate, and every industry, from oil and gas to tech, must be transformed. In short, we need a ‘Great Reset’ of capitalism.”

Of course, it goes without saying that “transforming every industry” and “revamping all aspects of our societies and economies” is a grandiose plan that would inevitably require coercion. Such is why so many opponents of the Great Reset have rightly criticized it as “soft authoritarianism.”

Although the Great Reset agenda does not openly call for a “totalitarian state” it is difficult to imagine a “Great Reset” world without totalitarianism.

Throughout human history, utopian movements have been launched in the name of the “greater good.” From the Bolshevik Revolution to Fidel Castro’s Cuba, almost every single one of these new world orders has devolved into totalitarian violence.

The simple reason for this is because grand visions, in which a small group of elites seek to reorder society, are doomed to fail. Globalist schemes like the Great Reset might sound well and good to some, but they will never be entirely embraced by all, especially the world over.

As Schwab says, “Clearly, the will to build a better society does exist. We must use it to secure the Great Reset that we so badly need. That will require stronger and more effective governments, though this does not imply an ideological push for bigger ones. And it will demand private-sector engagement every step of the way.”

The question is, if the will to build this better society does not exist voluntarily, how far will the Great Reset overlords go to make it happen anyways?

PHOTO: Booklet about stopping the Great Reset. Photo by Ivan Radic. Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0).

Chris Talgo (CTalgo@heartland.org) is an editor and research fellow at The Heartland Institute and a researcher and editor at StoppingSocialism.com.